Posts in PhD Student
Victoria Ewen
 
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Victoria is currently in her 4th year of the PhD program in Clinical Psychology. Her research interests include clinical program evaluation, as well as substance use and addictions. Her dissertation research, supervised by Dr. Mushquash, involves examining the acute effects of cannabis on mood and symptoms of anxiety and depression using ecological momentary assessment. She is supported by an Ontario Graduate Scholarship. Victoria enjoys doing yoga and spending time outdoors with her dog.

PhD StudentTyler Drawson
Elaine Toombs

Elaine Toombs is a 4th year PhD student in Clinical Psychology at Lakehead University. She is currently completing her predoctoral internship at Dilico Anishinabek Family Care, through the Northern Ontario Psychology Internship Consortium in Thunder Bay, Ontario. Elaine’s research interests include First Nations mental health, resilience, and parenting. Her dissertation research is supervised by Dr. Mushquash and examines adverse childhood experiences in a First Nations treatment seeking population. Elaine’s work is supported by a Canadian Institutes of Health Research Doctoral Award. She recently published a manuscript in the Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse. In her spare time, Elaine enjoys hiking, camping, and reading.

Publications

6.  Toombs, E., Drawson, A. S., Bobinski, T., Dixon, J., & Mushquash, C. J.  (2018).  First Nations Parenting and Child Reunification:  Identifying Strengths, Barriers, and Community Needs Within the Child Welfare System. Child & Family Social Work. 1-9.  DOI: 10.1111/cfs.12430

5.  Toombs, E., Unruh, A., McGrath, P.  (2017).  Assessing the Parent-Adolescent Communication Toolkit:  Usability and Preliminary Effectiveness. Nursing Open. DOI:10.1002/nop2.107

4.  Drawson, A. S., Toombs, E., & Mushquash, C. J. (2017). Indigenous Research Methods: A Systematic Review. The International Indigenous Policy Journal8(2), 5. DOI:10.18584/iipj.2017.8.2.5

3.  Toombs, E., Kowatch, K. R., & Mushquash, C. J.  (2016).  Resilience in Canadian Indigenous Youth: A scoping review.  International Journal of Child and Adolescent Resilience, 4(1), 4-32. 

2.  Campbell, S., Chong, S., Ewen, V., Toombs, E., Tzalazidis, R., & Maranzan, K. A. (2016). Social media policy for graduate students: Challenges and opportunities for professional psychology training programs. Canadian Psychology/Psychologie canadienne57(3), 202-210.

1.  Wozney, L., McGrath, P. J., Newton, A., Huguet, A., Franklin, M., Perri, K., Toombs, E., & Lingley-Pottie, P. (2015). Usability, learnability and performance evaluation of Intelligent Research and Intervention Software: A delivery platform for eHealth interventions. Health Informatics Journal, 1460458215586803.


PhD StudentTyler Drawson
Kristy Kowatch
 
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Kristy Kowatch is a 3rd year PhD student in Clinical Psychology at Lakehead University. Her research interests include culturally relevant mental health treatments for First Nation people, substance use as a form of self-medication, resilience in childhood and adolescence, as well as responsible gambling in northern Ontario and Indigenous populations. Her dissertation research is supervised by Dr. Mushquash and examines the development, implementation, and evaluation of a transdiagnostic group intervention for First Nations children, relying on cultural skills and practices as a medium for intervention. Kristy’s work is supported by a Canadian Institutes of Health Research Doctoral Award. She has published the article Resilience in Canadian Indigenous youth: A scoping review in the International Journal of Child and Adolescent Resilience. Kristy has recently received research funding from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research Project Grant competition and the Gambling Research Exchange Ontario’s BET 15k: Community Initiatives program. Kristy is also the recipient of a Canadian Institutes of Health Research Doctoral Research Award from the Institute of Indigenous Peoples; Health. Kristy enjoys snowboarding, gardening, and spending time with her dog.

Publications

4. Mutti-Packer, S., Kowatch, K., Steadman, R., Hodgins, D. C., el-Guebaly, N., Casey, D. M., . . . Smith, G. J. (2017). A qualitative examination of factors underlying transitions in problem gambling severity: Findings from the leisure, lifestyle, & lifecycle project. Addiction Research & Theory, 25(5), 424-431. doi: 10.1080/16066359.2017.1307967

3. Toombs, E., Kowatch, K.R., & Mushquash, C.J. (2016)Resilience in Canadian Indigenous youth: A scoping review. International Journal of Child and Adolescent Resilience4(1), 4-32.

2. Kowatch, K.R., & Hodgins, D.C. (2015). Predictors of treatment-seeking for gambling disorder from the transtheoretical model perspective. International Gambling Studies, 15(9), 450-469. doi: 10.1080/14459795.2015.1078391

1. Kowatch, K., Whalen, J. M., & Pexman, P.M. (2013). Irony comprehension in action: A new test of processing for verbal irony. Discourse Processes, 50(5), 301-315doi: 10.1080/0163853X.2013.799934    

PhD StudentTyler Drawson
Jessie Lund
 
 

Jessie Lund is a 2nd year PhD student in Clinical Psychology at Lakehead University. Her research focuses on the psychological and social sequelae of traumatic events. Her dissertation research is supervised by Dr. Mushquash and examines the interrelationships among executive functioning, substance use, and adverse childhood experiences in First Nations adults. Jessie’s work is supported by a Joseph-Armand Bombardier SSHRC Doctoral Scholarship. She recently published a manuscript in the Journal of Perinatal Education. Jessie recently received the Clinical Section Educational Activity Grant from the Canadian Psychological Association. She is also the recipient of the 2019 Section on Traumatic Stress Student Poster Award, and the 2019 Section on Women and Psychology Student Paper Award from the Canadian Psychological Association. Outside of academia, Jessie enjoys reading, hot yoga classes, and basketball.

Publications

5. Lund, J. I., Kleinplatz, P. J., Charest, M., & Huber, J. D. (Accepted). The relationship between the sexual self and the experience of pregnancy. The Journal of Perinatal Education.

4. Lund, J. I., Schmidt, L. A., Saigal, S., & Van Lieshout, R. J. (2017). Personality characteristics of adult survivors of preterm birth and childhood sexual abuse. Personality and Individual Differences117, 101-105. doi: 10.1016/j.paid.2017.05.028

3. Lund, J. I., Day, K. L., Schmidt, L. A., Saigol, S., & Van Lieshout, R. J. (2016). Adult social outcomes of extremely low birth weight survivors of childhood sexual abuse.Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease, 1-7. doi: 10.1017/s2040174416000532

2. Lund J. I., Day K. L., Schmidt L. A., Saigal S., & Van Lieshout, R. J. (2016). Adult mental health outcomes of child sexual abuse survivors born at extremely low birth weight.Child Abuse & Neglect, 59, 36-44. doi: 10.1016/j.chiabu.2016.07.002

1. Charest M., Kleinplatz, P. J., Lund, J. I. (2016). Sexual health information disparities between heterosexual and LGBTQ+ young adults: Implications for sexual health. The Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality, 25(2), 74-85. doi: 10.3138/cjhs.252-a9


PhD StudentTyler Drawson
Lauren Dalicandro

Lauren is a 1st year PhD student in the Clinical Psychology program at Lakehead University. Her research centres around substance use and improving intervention effectiveness and cultural fit. Her dissertation work focuses on the predictive ability of individual level factors on treatment outcomes of Indigenous individuals in a residential substance abuse program. Her dissertation research is supervised by Dr. Mushquash. Her MA thesis was a program evaluation of a culturally adapted parent management program for First Nations youth and their families in Thunder Bay. Her work is supported by the St. Joseph’s Care Group (CAHR) Award in Applied Health Research. In her free time, Lauren enjoys hiking, bouldering, and snowboarding.

PhD StudentTyler Drawson